Home > Martyria, Trinity 16-End of Church Year > Letting Jesus In, Letting Jesus Out. Trinity 22, 2016 Revelation 3:14-22

Letting Jesus In, Letting Jesus Out. Trinity 22, 2016 Revelation 3:14-22


revelation-1Twenty-Second Sunday after Trinity

St. Peter Lutheran Church

Revelation 3:14-22

October 23, 2016

“Letting Jesus In; Letting Jesus Out—Witnessing”

 

Iesu Iuva

 

Lutherans are not known for being fanatical.  No one faints from emotion in our Divine Services like they sometimes do in worship in other churches.  We aren’t known for looking for every opportunity to turn conversations toward spiritual matters or for peppering our speech with “God-talk.”

 

As a result, we may get the impression that as Lutherans we believe in moderation in spiritual matters or religion.  Yes, we believe that Jesus is our Savior.  But everything has its place.  We shouldn’t get too carried away with religion and end up making a spectacle of ourselves.

 

But that conclusion would be a mistake.  Emotional excesses in worship can be bad; it can also be bad to be preachy and act hyper-spiritual in your daily life.  Martin Luther criticized the “fanatics” or “enthusiasts” of his day for these things.  But Divine Service in his church in Wittenberg was not an emotionless formality, even though the congregation was made up entirely of normally stoic Germans.

 

An example of this: toward the end of his life, Luther was distributing the blood of Christ at Holy Communion.  He was old, and his hands shook.  As a result of his trembling, he spilled some of the precious blood on the stone floor near the altar.  The person who wrote down the story said that Luther’s eyes filled with tears at the dishonor he had inadvertently done to the Lord’s blood, and he said, “O Lord Jesus, help!”  Then he got down on his old hands and knees and sucked the consecrated blood of Christ from the stone floor, lest someone step on it.  And the congregation, instead of laughing or being disgusted at Luther’s piety toward the consecrated wine of the Lord’s Supper, toward the blood of Jesus, broke into sobs, seeing the old reformer do this.

 

Quite a bit of emotion, quite a visible display of zeal in practice for something Luther had taught people so zealously—that the Sacrament of the Altar is “the true body and blood of Christ, under the bread and wine, instituted by Christ Himself for us Christians to eat and to drink.”

 

Lutherans are, or should be, against making laws about the proper amount of emotion or the proper amount a Christian should display his faith in Christ in public.  A person may have true, living faith in Jesus and yet not talk about it a lot in public or display a lot of emotion at church.  Some of that has to do with a person’s temperament, some of it with the strength of his or her faith.  Some of it has to do with the fact that genuine faith is not a matter of outward display.

 

We make those allowances, yet we should never make the mistake of thinking that moderation in Christianity is good or even possible for a genuine Christian.  A Christian cannot be “lukewarm”, as the Lord tells the church in Laodicea that they are.  A Christian cannot be “neither cold nor hot.”  And a church that has become “neither cold nor hot” is one in which the cold and dead members have mixed to such a degree with the living, believing members that the entire church has become nauseating to the risen Lord Jesus.  “So because you are lukewarm, and neither hot nor cold, I will spit (or vomit) you out of my mouth.”  (Rev. 3:16)

 

Why does lack of zeal, “moderate Christianity”, “reasonable Christianity”, lukewarmness make Jesus sick?  We forget that Jesus Himself was not “moderate.”  He was (and is), we might say, a zealot, a radical.  Yes, He is amazingly gentle and patient with the weak, the sinful, and the fallen, so that He didn’t speak a harsh word to those crushed and overwhelmed by their sins, cast off by their society as “deplorable” and “irredeemable.”  Yet His graciousness toward sinners was never grace toward sin itself.  He “gave Himself for us to redeem us from all lawlessness and to purify for Himself a people for His own possession who are zealous for good works” (Titus 2:14).  He was so committed, so passionate in His hatred of sin that He gave His life not only to forgive and cover sin but also to remove and destroy it.  He was so passionate in His opposition to false and hypocritical worship that He went into the temple and threw down the tables of the money changers.  He was so zealous in opposing the false teaching of the Pharisees, scribes, and chief priests that He continued to preach and teach the Gospel of grace in opposition to them, and to denounce them, until they connived to have Him crucified.  Jesus was and is not cool and moderate.  He is fiery.  His feet gleam like gold coming out of a fire.  His face shines like the sun.  His eyes are like flames.  He is hot and burning with love for His Father and for you.

 

Because He burns with charity He is infinitely gentle with the weak, but He is nauseated by lukewarmness.  When people and churches claim to be Christian but are moderate and reasonable in their love for God, His good news of grace, and for other sinners, when they are lukewarm, self-satisfied, content, and unwilling to do anything that might risk their comfort, it makes our Lord ill.  He can’t stand it.  He will spit such Christianity, such so-called “Christians”, such churches out of His mouth.  That, says the Lord of the Church to the congregation is Laodicea, is the kind of church you are.

 

How did the church in Laodicea become this way—lukewarm, neither cold nor hot, disgusting to its Lord?    He tells them: You say, I am rich, I have prospered, I need nothing…(Rev. 3:17)  The church in Laodicea had become wealthy and prosperous in earthly goods.  But this wasn’t the cause of their lukewarmness.  They were lukewarm because they were not “rich toward God” (Luke 12:21).  They foolishly believed that since they had earthly wealth they “lacked nothing.”  We can draw this conclusion as well—their wealth indicated that the church in Laodicea had not had to endure the persecution we saw in the other churches.  Persecuted Christians are typically denied the opportunities available to the rest of society.  High positions are often denied them.

 

It may also be that the church in Laodicea had made a practice of compromising with the pagan world around them.  Back a few generations ago lots of people belonged to secret societies like the Freemasons or the other lodges, but it was forbidden in the Missouri Synod, because the members of those societies took part in religious rites and confessions of faith that were contrary to the confession of faith they made as members of the Lutheran Church.  Today people are often offended by the practice of “closed communion” which is the practice and teaching of the Missouri Synod.  By practicing “closed communion” we are saying that communing at a church is tied to confessing faith in that church’s teaching.  As a result those who believe another doctrine, or who are in fellowship with those who teach another doctrine, should not commune at LCMS altars, nor should those who confess our doctrine commune at a church with another doctrine.  That teaching offends people today; but for a century and a few decades, the LCMS’ teaching about lodge membership was an offensive teaching to many (even inside the LCMS).

People typically belonged to lodges or to the Masons—at least, this is what most people said—for the sake of business.  Lodge members helped each other out and sent business one another’s way.  Not being a member of a lodge could hurt people financially.  It was this way for people in the early church too.  If you wouldn’t step foot in the temple of an idol or burn incense to Caesar, it could hurt your business opportunities.  Yet the church in Laodicea was prosperous.  It’s quite possible they had become this way by compromising their witness to Christ by engaging in the worship of idols, or giving the appearance of this being possible for a faithful Christian.

 

The church in Laodicea put its trust in its earthly wealth and in the freedom from persecution it had experienced.  Since it had those things, it didn’t think it needed anything else.  It became a church where Jesus was left outside in the cold, knocking on the door to be let in.  But the Laodiceans wouldn’t let Jesus in.  Jesus was sure to take away their prosperity and their seeming peace and security.  He would bring with Him white robes to put on—His innocence and righteousness before God.  But He would also rub eye salve on their eyes and make them see that they were really wretched, pitiful, impoverished, and naked before God.  And He would bring gold refined in the fire—that is, faith in Him instead of in earthly prosperity and security, and the fire of persecution, of suffering and trial that purifies our faith in Christ.  That true gold from Jesus very probably would mean the loss of the perishable gold that they had come to trust in and see as a sign that God was pleased with them.

 

The churches in the nations that have had Christianity for centuries have a lot in common with the church in Laodicea.  Christianity was the dominant religion in Europe for almost 2000 years in the south, and by about 1000 A.D. it had travelled to the northernmost reaches of Europe.  From there it spread to every continent that Europeans colonized or settled.  And for most of that time the churches did not experience persecution in an overt way.  There was persecution of faithful Christians, but it was always by others who also claimed to be Christians; in Europe and America no one persecuted the church with the open admission that it was Christianity they were attacking.  Only in the French Revolution in 1789 did we see the first explicit persecution of Christians by non-Christians.  It happened again in Russia and other places where communism took hold.  But in America the church has never experienced that.  On the contrary, up until recently the churches experienced peace.  They were large and prosperous, and its members became wealthy.

 

And as a result many people came to expect earthly peace and prosperity.  They saw full pews not with suspicion, as a sign perhaps that the church had compromised with the world, but as a sign of the church’s success, perhaps even of its godliness.  They became content.

 

And now that the pews are emptying in many churches, and the heat is being turned on by forces that oppose Christianity’s formerly dominant position in our country, we see many churches and Christians scrambling to find ways to fill the pews up again, to regain our former position of cultural dominance.

 

Why?  Because the churches have come to trust in earthly peace, freedom from persecution, and earthly prosperity.  They think that when they have those things “they need nothing,” but if those things are gone, they have lost everything.

 

But a church that trusts in earthly peace and prosperity is a church that leaves Jesus outside in the cold, knocking to be let in.  A church like this can’t witness to Jesus.  Their witness will not be faithful and true (Rev. 3:14); they may preach and talk about Jesus, who was crucified.  But if their trust is in the earthly peace and security that comes from large numbers and cultural dominance, when the fire and heat of persecution comes to purify them, they will cast Jesus aside.  Witness to Jesus means faithfully teaching His Word, but it also includes the witness of suffering for that Word.  That is the way the devil is conquered, just as Jesus conquered Satan not by gaining the whole world but giving His life on the cursed, shameful cross.

 

During this fall series we have heard with our ears “what the Spirit says to the churches.”  I pray that God also gives us ears to hear with repentance and faith.  What does the Spirit say to this church, St. Peter, in the letter to the church in Laodicea?

 

It is a hard question to face willingly.  Are we also “lukewarm, neither hot nor cold”, about to be spit out of the mouth of our Lord?  And if so, what should we do?

 

If I say “Yes,” how easy it will be simply to get angry at me, and reject my answer as my opinion, not Christ’s.  How easy it will be also, if you accept the judgment, to simply put your head down like a beaten dog and say, “It’s impossible to please God.”

 

But that isn’t why Jesus speaks this way to the church in Laodicea.  He didn’t write them off as hopeless.  He came as a petitioner, knocking on the door, calling to them to let them in to His house.  He does the same with all churches that have become lukewarm, just as He once called out to Adam when he was hiding in the garden, running away from his Lord because he had sinned and was afraid of the punishment.

 

–similarity:

Idolizing the earthly prominence we once enjoyed

 

That prominence was not evil, but we have something better than that—Jesus, who was crucified for us, Jesus, the risen Lord of the church and of the world

 

That idolizing has kept us from witnessing to Him in a community where we have great opportunity.

 

Jesus not only knocks on the door to come into the Church, but He wants to go out in us to extend His kingdom through the preaching of the Gospel which He has given to us.

 

+Let Jesus in

 

-recognize our sin in clinging to earthly security, peace, prosperity

-desire to bear “faithful and true witness” to Him in our families, to our friends and neighbors, as a church in our community.

 

–believe the Gospel: His zeal covers our natural lukewarmness; His love our lovelessness; His willingness to suffer for others our self-seeking

–your lukewarmness which you will struggle with till the day you die is covered, cleansed, forgiven

 

–this repentance and faith is the work of the Holy Spirit alone

–but it has begun where there is the desire to change and be forgiven.

 

+Let Jesus out

–witnessing to Jesus: two parts.  Proclaiming His Word faithfully, and standing fast under the hardship and even persecution that comes because of His Word.

 

–proclaiming the Word—both law and gospel

Sin and righteousness

 

–home/family/neighbors

–as a church: planning, going into the community and inviting them in.  Welcoming those who come.

 

–Suffering and persecution:

This comes by itself

Enduring it, and continuing to be faithful and true witnesses to Christ, is witnessing embodied, not simply in talk

There we give a picture in our lives of the Christ who suffered to save sinners.

 

+Jesus comes in to us

This is “dining with Jesus” having fellowship and communion with Him

By faith we cling to Him, are joined with Him.  We share His grace and His suffering.

 

Sharing with Him in suffering is followed by sharing with Him in glory.

 

May we go out with Him, even if these are the final years of our congregation’s life, so that we may rejoice forever in our fellowship with Him.

 

Amen.

 

Soli Deo Gloria

 

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