Home > Holy Week, Piles in my office > Laying Him Bare From Thigh To Neck. Good Friday–Tenebrae. March 30, 2018

Laying Him Bare From Thigh To Neck. Good Friday–Tenebrae. March 30, 2018


Good Friday—Tenebrae (7pm)

St. Peter Lutheran Church

Lamentations 2:8-3:9; Hebrews 4: 16-5:10; Habakkuk 3:1-12jesus crucifixion grunewald isenheim.PNG

March 30, 2018

“Laying Him Bare from Thigh To Neck”

 

Iesu Iuva

In the Name of Jesus.

 

Mine eyes do fail with tears, my bowels are troubled, my liver is poured upon the earth, for the destruction of the daughter of my people; because the children and sucklings swoon in the streets of the city.  They say to their mothers, “Where is corn and wine?”  When they swooned in the streets of the city, when their soul was poured out into their mother’s bosom.  Lamentations 2:11-12

 

It’s good this is in King James English.  Otherwise we might all be crying as we hear Jeremiah’s lament.

 

The prophet is sick as he looks at what is going to happen to the daughter of his people, Jerusalem.  My liver is poured out on the earth.  He vomits as he watches, until nothing is left except bile coming out of his mouth.  He sees children and babies dying of hunger during the siege of Jerusalem.  Babies die on their mother’s breasts because their mothers can no longer produce milk.  And little children say to their mothers, “Why is there no food?  What happened to all the corn and wine we used to have?”  Anyone with children can imagine what it would be like to try to answer this question from their small children who are too young to understand.  And watch them fade with hunger, and finally faint in the streets from it, and die.

 

This has probably happened to people in my lifetime thousands, millions of times, in places ravaged by war.

 

It just has never happened to us.  Just like it hadn’t happened to Jeremiah’s people, to the nation that was in a covenant with God.  But finally in Jeremiah’s day, all their years of forsaking that covenant with God caught up with them.  Jerusalem was destroyed.  The temple was destroyed.  Children died.  Those who didn’t die were taken in chains to Babylon.

 

What happened then is going to happen again.  As judgment came upon Judah, so it will come on the whole world for all its centuries of casting aside God’s Law and ignoring the Gospel of His Son.  And the hunger, the chains, the death that will come will not last for seventy years.

 

That’s why Jesus told the women who followed Him as He carried His cross to Golgotha: Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me, but for yourselves and your children!  For the time is coming when people will say, ‘Blessed are the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!’

 

What our Lord says is true, but it is so painful that we cannot bear to think about it.  It would be better to never be born than to be damned, better to never have a child than for that child to be lost forever.  Yet that is the road most people are on.  Can’t we see it?

 

And even before the last judgment, the years leading up to it will make people wish they had never been born.  There will not only be physical suffering and a famine of bread, but a spiritual famine that will make the eyes of Christians fail with tears and pour their livers on the earth.  People will starve because they will not be able to find the bread of God’s Word.  The walls of Jerusalem will be broken down, and the hosts of the devil will pour in with their glinting weapons, with teachings that destroy souls.

 

And these days are already upon us.  Can’t we see it?  Those of us with children, grandchildren.  Do we have tears in our eyes as we see the gaping holes in the walls of the church and the demons howling through the gap?  How few of them will remain in the church a few decades from now?  And those who remain—where will they go to have their babies baptized, to receive the body and blood of the Lord, to hear the pure, saving word of God?  Will they have to drive hours?  Will they have to choose between going to a church with corrupt teaching and worshipping God in their homes?

 

This is where our world is.  If we had hearts that were not mostly dead, we would cry like Jeremiah, be sick like Jeremiah.  Yet neither you nor I feel much.

 

It is too much to bear, and we have so little faith that we do not pray about it very often or for very long.  So we turn on the television, fire up the internet, get busy with this and with that, and get numb.

 

Another prophet about the same time as Jeremiah, Habakkuk, had a different reaction.  He did not weep.  He prayed and asked God to renew the work of vengeance He had done in the Exodus in his own day.  We will be singing Habakkuk’s prayer shortly.

 

And God gave Habakkuk a vision of the day when He would answer his prayer.  God came from Teman, and the Holy One from Mount Paran…His brightness was like the light; rays flashed from His hand; and there He veiled His power.  Before Him went pestilence, and plague followed at his heels.  He stood and measured the earth.  He looked and scattered the nations…The sun and the moon stood still in their place at the light of your arrows as they sped, at the flash of your glittering spear…You went out for the salvation of your people, for the salvation of your anointed.  You crushed the head of the wicked, laying him bare from thigh to neck.

 

Oh, that would be wonderful, would it not?  To see our God come out to save us with His unspeakable power, and destroy those who are destroying us?

 

Do you realize that that is what Jesus did today?

 

The compassion of Jeremiah that is lacking in us is not lacking in Jesus.  He went out for the salvation of His people to Calvary to be brutally killed.  Because though the daughters of Jerusalem were not weeping for themselves and for their children, He was.  He did.

 

Jesus our Lord sees very clearly what is in store for you and your children and your neighbors because of your sins.  He not only sees it.  He feels the agony of the hell that opens its mouth to swallow you, the agony ahead of the unrepentant, from which you and I hide our faces.

 

What Jeremiah said about himself in the 3rd chapter of his Lamentations was fulfilled in Jesus:

 

I am the man that hath seen affliction and the rod of His wrath.  Surely against me is He turned; He turneth His hand against me all the day… He hath hedged me about that I cannot get out, and made my chain heavy.  Also when I cry and shout, He shutteth out my prayer.  He hath enclosed my ways with hewn stone…

 

Paul says to you who believe in Jesus: As surely as God is faithful, our word to you has not been Yes and No.  For the Son of God, Jesus Christ, whom we proclaimed among you…was not Yes and No, but in Him it is always Yes.  (2 Cor. 1)

 

In Jesus God says yes to us and holds nothing back from us of His grace, love, riches, glory.

 

But when Jesus prayed to His Father in Gethsemane, God’s answer was “No.”  No, Jesus could not escape the judgment of God, the hell of our sins.  Until, with the sun gone black, Jesus screamed from the cross, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken Me?”  God shut out Jesus’ prayer.  He closed Jesus in, not merely with mockers and enemies, but with our sins and their unending punishment.  He could not get out.  The heavy chain of our sins that sinks us down to hell was fastened on Him.  Until He died and was enclosed with the hewn stone of the tomb.

 

He was the man. Pilate brought Him out to the crowd covered with blood, bruises, spit, with a reed, a robe, a crown of thorns.  “Behold the man,” Pilate said.

 

Behold the man who has seen affliction and the rod of God’s wrath, and removed that rod from your back forever.

 

For God appointed Him a great high priest after the order of Melchizedek.  He was appointed to be priest not because he was born in a priestly family or because he went to school, but because of the power of a life that cannot be destroyed.  He is the king of righteousness.  His righteousness makes Him a priest who lives forever, able to reconcile you to God once and for all, to settle with Him for you.

 

So the author of Hebrews tells us that we should boldly, confidently come near the throne of grace to receive from the one who presides over that throne grace and mercy in our time of need—for ourselves, children, and neighbors.

 

We should not let ourselves shrink from facing the terrible plight of the people around us who are on the way to hell, or timidly draw back because of the terrible coldness of our hearts, but boldly go and lay before Him our hearts and the lost ones we cannot save ourselves.

 

You do not have a high priest unable to sympathize with your weaknesses, but one who was tempted with them all.  Even more, who was condemned for the temptations you gave in to.  He plunged into the endless death, the bottomless pit of condemnation that belongs to your sins and those of your unrepentant family and neighbors.  Do you think he doesn’t care about them, that he won’t hear you when you plead for them?

 

Do not think that.  Don not believe it.  Rejoice in the privilege you have been given.  You have a great high priest who not only offered a sacrifice that removes your sins, but gave Himself to be the sacrifice.

 

When He did that the might of the Lord Habakkuk saw in His vision was at work.  His power was veiled on the cross, but there He became the plague and pestilence of hell.  He shook the earth with His death and it gave up its dead.  The sun stood still and was darkened at the flash of His spear as in fury He crushed the head of the wicked one, laying him open from thigh to neck.

 

When He went out to Golgotha under His cross He went out for the salvation of His people, for your salvation.  And what He set out to do in omnipotent might He performed.

 

Hear His cry from the cross, the cry of victory—your victory cry.  “It is finished!”

 

The peace of God that passes understanding keep your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.  Amen.

Soli Deo Gloria

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