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The God We Know. Catechetical Sermon, February 2015

Most Holy TrinityCatechetical Vespers

St. Peter Lutheran Church

The Apostles’ Creed (Matthew 3)

February 27, 2015

“The God We Know”

Iesu Iuva

Most people, if you ask them, believe in some kind of a god, even today. But if you ask them who their God is and what he is like, their answers become sketchy. Ask them what his name is, and they probably won’t know.

It’s not that way for you, because you are a Christian. You know God’s Name. He has made Himself known to you in the teaching of the Scriptures, in your catechesis into the mysteries of the Christian faith. You know what He requires of you, because you have learned His Ten Commandments. And you know who God is and what He does, because He teaches you in the Creed.

In the Ten Commandments you learned what God wants you to do, how He wants you to live. In the Creed He teaches you to know Him and what He has done. He has given you life and protected you. He has redeemed you from your sins. And He has made you holy and continues to make you holy.

Who is God? You can answer out loud.

The Apostles’ Creed confesses faith in one God who is three distinct persons: The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. These are not three Gods, but one. But they are not one person, but three.

This is a great mystery that is beyond our ability to understand. But we believe it—that God is triune—three persons in one eternal God. People outside the church don’t know or believe this. They know there is some kind of a god, but they don’t know who He is. We know God is the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

What does the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit do? He creates, redeems, and sanctifies us. He makes us, saves us from our sins, and makes us holy.

The first article of the Creed teaches us about God the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth. The Father created us and all the universe out of nothing. He not only created the world a long time ago, but He continues to preserve the world so that the sun shine and the earth gives food. He provides us everything we need for this body and life. We don’t see Him doing it. We see the farmer grow the food and the sun shine on the plants to make them grow. But God is the maker of the sun, the food, and the farmer. And by His command the sun, the food, and the farmer continue to carry out their work and be the instruments through which the Father feeds us our daily bread. He also watches over and protects us so that we are shielded from many dangers and troubles we would otherwise experience. We can put the 1st article of the Creed to work in our daily lives by thanking God every time we are provided with what we need for life, by thanking Him whenever we are shielded from danger, and by calling on Him for help in every need we have in earthly life. God the Father cares about our bodies, our physical and emotional needs, because He made them and gave them to us, and He takes care of them.

Just for this alone, that God the Father made us, provides for us, defends us and watches over us—for this alone we owe Him all thanks and praise and to serve and obey Him with our whole heart.

But as you have learned from the Ten Commandments, we do not serve and thank God with our whole hearts. In fact, every day we sin much and really deserve nothing but punishment.   Our hearts are always desiring to do what is against God’s commandments. This is something that people outside the Holy Christian Church don’t know. They think we are not perfect, but as long as we try pretty hard to do what’s right God is satisfied.

They don’t know that to be righteous in God’s eyes we must keep His commandments and love Him with all our heart and soul. And they don’t know or believe that we are unable to do it because we were born sinful and unclean, by nature dead spiritually and enemies of God.

Because we are this way and could not make ourselves righteous, God the Son, the second person of the Trinity, redeemed us. He paid for us to be regarded or counted righteous. He justified us. How? God the Son was conceived by the Holy Spirit in the womb of the virgin Mary, was born for us, lived under the commandments of God, fulfilled them for us, and then suffered and died on the cross to make atonement for our sins, to pay their penalty. He became a human being like us and offered Himself as the substitute for the whole human race. God’s anger and punishment for all our sins and failure to serve Him fell on Jesus, and Jesus took it out of the way. He redeemed us, bought us back from sin, death, and the devil. He paid for all our sins in full so that we no longer have any sin to pay for. We are regarded as righteous because of Him.

And He rose from the dead on the third day, showing that our sins have been forgiven and that we no longer belong to death but to life, because He has freed human beings from death. He ascended into heaven, where He prays to the Father on our behalf, rules the universe for our good, and preaches His saving Word and gives His body and blood through the ministers He sends. And on the last day God the Son will return to judge the living and the dead, to give eternal life to us and all believers in Christ and to condemn to eternal death those who do not believe in Him.

But we could never believe in what God the Son had done for us unless God worked in our hearts, because we are by nature sinful and enemies of God. So the third person of the Holy Trinity, the Holy Spirit, does His work of sanctification, or making holy. He proclaims what Jesus has done to take away our sins through the preaching of the Gospel. He says, “Jesus has died for your sins, and all by Himself, without any help from you, has made you right with God.” He says that when the Word is preached. He also says it in Baptism—“What Jesus did on the cross is for you.” He also says it in the absolution through the pastor after we confess our sins: “I forgive you all your sins in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” And the Holy Spirit speaks and tells us that Jesus’ death on the cross is for us in the Sacrament of the Altar, when the pastor says Jesus’ words—“This is my body which is given for you…This is my blood, which is shed for you for the forgiveness of sins.”

And through these things, the Word and Sacraments, the Holy Spirit not only tells us our sins are forgiven through Jesus. He also works in our hearts so that we believe it and say, “Jesus died for me too, so my sins are surely forgiven.” No one can believe this on their own. When you believe it is because God the Holy Spirit has worked on you and in you to make you holy.

And when He brings us to faith in Jesus so that we are justified, counted righteous, He also begins to work in us so that we do the righteous works that please God. We begin to hate our sins and want to be forgiven and freed of them. We begin to want to do what pleases God. And we begin to keep His commandments out of thankfulness to the Father who made us and the Son who redeemed us.

The Holy Spirit sanctifies us, makes us holy. He creates faith in Jesus in us and a new man who begins to do the good works that please God. And the Holy Spirit does this for the whole Holy Christian Church. He gathers the believers in Christ together into one body, one communion, where we all share together in the forgiveness of sins. He keeps us together in the one true faith. He preserves our faith until we die, and then on the last day He will raise us and all the dead and give eternal life to all believers in Christ.

This is how the Creed teaches us to know our God. We are not in the dark about God. We are His people—created and fed by Him, redeemed by Him, made holy by Him and growing in holiness. We are called by His name because we have been baptized in the name of this one true God—the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. And we know Him. He is the God who made us, who saved us with His blood, who declares us Holy and is making us holy.

Amen.

Soli Deo Gloria

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