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Thanksgiving for the Lord’s Discipline. Thanksgiving Day 2016. Deuteronomy 8:1-10

January 11, 2017 Leave a comment

puritanos-peregrinosThanksgiving Day

St. Peter Lutheran Church

Deuteronomy 8:1-10 (1 Timothy 2:1-4)

November 24, 2016

“Thanksgiving for the Lord’s Discipline”

 

Iesu Iuva

 

Setting apart a day to give thanks to God has a long history in America.  The Pilgrims didn’t invent it.  The French and Spanish explorers are said to have had their own “thanksgivings” to give thanks to God for allowing them to arrive safely in the new world.  A group of English settlers in Virginia wrote a constitution for their colony in 1619 that said “that the day of our ships arrival … in the land of Virginia shall be yearly and perpetually kept holy as a day of thanksgiving to Almighty God.”  Both Catholics and Protestants set aside days of Thanksgiving because they recognized, or wanted people to recognize, that they didn’t get to America safely or accomplish anything here on their own.  God enabled them and allowed them.  Without His favor they would have died on the voyage, and without His favor they would not be able to succeed in anything once they arrived.  So together, as a society, they gave thanks to God, recognizing His hand in the events of their lives, and thanking Him for the good He allowed them to receive in spite of their many sins against Him.

 

We aren’t like this anymore in America.  We don’t recognize God’s hand in the things that happen to us as a nation.  And imagine the President or Congress announcing a national day of thanksgiving, or a national day of supplication and prayer, in response to some great blessing received or tragedy experienced by the nation, announcing that schools and businesses and the stock exchange would be closed so that the nation might turn to God for a day!

 

Things are not much better in the Church among Christians.  If we announced a special service of thanksgiving in response to a special blessing of God on a day that people are not accustomed to coming to church, I know very well what would happen.  Even, say, if someone wrote a check to St. Peter for several hundred thousand dollars, covering the whole cost of our roof repairs.  This is an indication that for many people worship is not the spontaneous, living response of their hearts to God’s love and gifts; for many people it is a formality, doing what they think is required and no more.  Worship is on Sunday, period.

 

But God does not stop being our God at noon on Sundays.  He doesn’t stop giving us gifts then or providing for our needs of body and soul.  Every day He lets His sun shine on the just and the wicked alike.  I believe that God has made me and all creatures, that He has given me my body and soul, eyes, ears, and all my members, my reason and all my senses, and still takes care of them [or preserves them] Luther’s Catechism teaches us to say.  And it goes on to remind us of all the gifts He gives us, day in and day out, whether we please Him or not: He also gives me clothing and shoes, food and drink, house and home, wife and children, land, animals, and all I have.  He richly and daily provides me with all that I need to support this body and life.  He defends me against all danger and guards and protects me from all evil.  For all this it is my duty to thank and praise, serve and obey Him.

 

Yes, as we sing in the communion liturgy each week, “It is truly good, right, and salutary that we should at all times and in all places give thanks to You, Holy Lord, Almighty Father, Everlasting God, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  It’s only right that we should recognize that God has given us our life and existence, and that He constantly provides for our lives to be sustained, whether we do good or evil.  And recognizing this, it’s right that we should give thanks from our hearts to Him at all times.  And when He shows us special kindness as a church or as a nation, it is right that we should publicly thank Him in the Church with a special service of thanksgiving.

 

This has immediate practical importance for your lives as individuals, this issue of recognizing God’s hand in your life and thanking Him.  Because if we do not recognize God as the giver of the good things in our lives and give Him thanks—the things that we need and the people and things we love—we will not be able to recognize Him as the giver of the things that seem evil to us.  When we get sick and when we suffer in various ways, we will feel ourselves abandoned or cursed by God, because we have not learned to recognize Him and His hand in all that we experience in life.

 

Consider the reading from the Old Testament, Deuteronomy chapter 8.  You would think that the people of Israel would have no difficulty understanding that God was intimately involved with what happened to them.  He had, after all, sent ten plagues on the Egyptians to make Pharaoh let them go; led them by a pillar of cloud by day and a pillar of fire by night in the wilderness; parted the Red Sea to bring Israel through in safety and then drowned Pharaoh and his mighty army.  He had fed them with bread from heaven in the desert.  He had come down on Mt. Sinai in fire and spoke the Ten Commandments to them.  He had entered into a covenant with them there that they would be His people and He would be there God.

 

And yet they did not recognize that God was among them and leading them.  At the beginning of their exodus, right after coming through the Red Sea, they went a few days without water and began to say, “Is the Lord among us or not?”  (Ex. 17:7)  Then Moses struck a rock with his staff, and water came out for the whole congregation of 3 million.  But after 40 years in the wilderness they had still not learned to recognize God’s presence among them and how He was providing for them and teaching Him the whole way.  So Moses explains to them, not long before his death: You shall remember the whole way that the Lord your God has led you these forty years in the wilderness, that he might humble you, testing you to know what was in your heart, whether you would keep his commandments or not.  And he humbled you and let you hunger and fed you with manna, which you did not know, nor did your fathers know, that he might make you know that man does not live by bread alone, but man lives by every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord…Know then, that as a man disciplines his son, so the Lord your God disciplines you.  Deut. 8:2-3, 5

                                                                                                                                  

The Israelites did not understand the reason why they experienced the things they did, why after God gloriously led them out of Egypt, He allowed them to wander in circles in the desert for 40 years.  Maybe many of them began to think that God’s promise that He loved them and had chosen them to be His own people out of all the nations on the earth was just religious talk that doesn’t actually have any significance in real life, because they seemed like they were going nowhere, and the promised land seemed a long way away.

 

But Moses explained that no, God did have a reason for their wandering in circles.  As a man disciplines his son, so the Lord your God disciplines you.  A man disciplines his son because he loves his son.  Kids with strict parents look at other kids whose parents let them do whatever they want and think those kids have it better.  But as adults we understand that parents who let their kids do whatever they want on the internet without paying attention, who let their kids run around as teenagers without paying attention to what they’re doing are parents who don’t love their kids very much.  Parents who love their kids allow their kids freedom when their kids have proven that they can handle the freedom without ruining themselves.  They “test” their kids “to know what is in [their] hearts.”

 

This is why God led the Israelites in circles in the desert forty years, why He humbled them so that they had to rely on God to drop bread down from heaven if they were going to eat.  He didn’t allow them much freedom at all, did He?  It was to discipline them so that they worshipped Him—that is, so that they believed in Him, so that they trusted Him, so that they learned faith in Him.  Then when they entered the promised land and suddenly had houses that other people built, and rich farmland that other people cultivated, they would not turn away from Him and think they had gotten all this for themselves, or worship the idols of the people who lived there before them.  They would remember the Lord who brought them out of slavery and give Him thanks for the good land that He had given them.

 

Another amazing thing is hidden in that sentence: Know then in your heart, that, as a man disciplines his son, so the Lord your God disciplines you.  It’s easy to focus on the word “discipline” and think of a dad in the old days taking his son behind the woodshed with a switch or something.  But that is not the key word: the key word is “son.”  I don’t think anywhere before the exodus of the people of Israel did God call any human being his “son,” not even Abraham or Noah or Enoch, who walked with God.  But here Moses tells the people of Israel that God has been treating them like His Son.  A man disciplines his son not only because he loves him but because the son is going to inherit everything that belongs to his father, and he needs to learn to be wise so that he will be capable of managing his inheritance instead of destroying it and himself.  God is dealing with Israel, rebellious Israel, idol-worshipping Israel, as His own son, whom he is preparing to inherit everything that is His.

 

This would have little meaning for us as Gentiles, as non-Israelites.  Our ancestors worshipped idols, and God did not discipline them and deal with them as His sons.  But long ago someone came to them and taught them about Jesus and proclaimed Him as the Son of God.  And our believing ancestors taught their children about Him until it came down to us.

 

We learned that Jesus, the Son of God from eternity, through whom God the Father created and preserves the world, became the son of Adam, one of us.  He lived among us so that we might see in Him the exact image of God the Father.  And being our brother, He died for our sins, was raised from the dead, and ascended with our human nature to the throne of God.  Through His suffering the wrath of God for our sins, He caused human beings to be adopted by God as sons; and He received the inheritance of eternal glory in human flesh as a pledge of what is to come for all who believe in Him.

 

Because of Him, you have a certain pledge from God about what His heart is toward you and what He is doing in the events of your life.

 

They are not random, meaningless events, like the Israelites were tempted to think.  God is dealing with you as sons.  He is dealing with you like a father who loves his son and who wants to prepare him to inherit all that is his.

 

A father loves his son, so he provides for him; he gives him food, shelter, clothes, and defends him from danger.  At the same time, because he loves his son, he also tests him and disciplines him.  He humbles him so that he learns to be faithful and obedient when he is not entrusted with much freedom.  He schools him so that when he grows to be a man and inherits his father’s house, he will not squander it and ruin himself.

 

Many of you are dealing with personal suffering that is hard to see as God’s love.  You are sick or have constant pain.  It may be that the doctor has told you you have a limited amount of time left on earth.  Others are suffering from seeing their children or relatives in conflict or unforgiveness, or having abandoned God.

 

We grieve over what our nation has become, many of us, since many of our people have forgotten right and wrong, forgotten what is decent and good.  Most have also forgotten God and seem to be past repentance.

 

And then for many of us there is the grief at the state of the church—especially our own congregation, but also the Christian church more generally in our country….

 

 

How can we give thanks?

 

God has not stopped being kind, gracious, and merciful.  See how freely Jesus heals the lepers of their diseases, even though 9 out of 10 are unthankful.  He continues to provide us with wealth, peace, safety.

 

But when we suffer He is dealing with us as sons.  See how His only begotten Son was chastened with the lash for your sins, how He hung on the cross, suspended by nails in His hands and feet, crowned with a curse, abandoned by God.  Did the Father love Jesus?  He did.  Yet Jesus, though He was a son, was made perfect through suffering.

 

God is dealing with you as sons, preparing you to inherit glory with Jesus.

 

Do not lose heart.  Go against your heart and praise Him “at all times and in all places.”  Recognize His love not only in your daily bread, in the turkey on the table and the family gathered around it, but also in your afflictions.

 

Amen.

 

SDG

Prayer in Great Disgust and Disgrace. Luther.

September 5, 2012 2 comments

424.  Prayer in Great Vexation or Disgrace (Widerwaertigkeit)

Job discussing theology with his dumbass friends and wife: “Wait a second… I don’t preach enough Gospel?”

Martin Luther(trans. Sept. 5 2012)

Oh God, do not punish me in wrath Psalm 6:1.  Let Your punishment be in grace and here in time; punish as Father and not as judge.  Oh God, be angry here on earth.  Strike here, beat here, but there in eternity, spare us.  Amen.

 

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