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Be Bold! Rogate, the Sixth Sunday of Easter, 2017. 160th Anniversary of the Congregation. St. John 16:23-33

GideonRogate, the Sixth Sunday of Easter/ 160th Anniversary of St. Peter Lutheran Church

St. Peter Lutheran Church

St. John 16: 23-33

May 21, 2017

Be Bold!

Iesu Iuva

Alleluia! Christ is risen!

Jesus tells His disciples about something in the Gospel reading that will be necessary for them after He ascends to the Father, and they are left in the world, seeing Him no longer, something that the disciples will need for prayer, and something they will need in order to carry out their mission in the world without Jesus’ visible presence.  That something is boldness, daring.

If Jesus’ word to His disciples here had been recorded in American instead of Greek, maybe it would have used our phrase, “Have some guts!”

The disciples of Jesus will need to be bold, daring in order to ask the Father in Jesus’ name. They will need to take heart, as our translation says it; they will need to “be of good courage if they are going to continue in faith in their Lord and continue His work in this world in which they will have tribulation.

That is our Lord’s word to us on this morning where we are gathered to give thanks for the 160th year of St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church. Take heart!  Be of good courage!Be bold!  Be daring!

Here on our 160th year many of us are anxious. Our future as a congregation appears uncertain. Many have already concluded that it is only a matter of time before St. Peter has a service of thanksgiving that marks the congregation’s end, just as later today we will be doing with St. Peter’s school. Those who love that school are already full of anguish, grieving the loss.  We ought to have compassion for this grief.

At the anniversary dinner last night for the church I saw tears in the eyes of men who do not cry as we saw the pictures of beloved brothers and sisters in Christ who our Lord has taken from this valley of sorrows to Himself in heaven. There is no doubt about how much many of you love this congregation, and the pain that would be in your heart if you were forced to say goodbye to it.  Let us have compassion on those among us who were closest to St. Peter school and are therefore already grieving.

But even now, many who work tirelessly at St. Peter, giving hours and hours every week, are anxious, full of heaviness, worn out with work that never seems to bring the desired results.  We would like renewal for St. Peter, security for St. Peter, visible assurance that when our work is over, this congregation that we have been nurtured by and love will outlive us.  But it doesn’t appear to come.

Again, the word of our Lord to His apostles is the word of Jesus to us this morning, grieving at the closing of St. Peter school, anxious about the future of St. Peter congregation: In the world you have tribulation.  But take heart; I have conquered the world.  (John 16:32-33)  Be bold, says our Lord; be daring! Be of good courage!  Have a smile on your faces in tribulation, uncertainty, in the face of looming death!

Lord Jesus!  How can you say this to us? Don’t you know we are flesh and blood, not gods?  We fear death! We are weak and needy, and are terrified when the things that give our lives meaning are taken away!  Have mercy on us!  How can we obey this command?

Don’t doubt that Jesus knows who we are, what we are, what we are capable of; that He knows our weakness, our fear.  Don’t suppose His compassion for us is as little as our ability to understand it.

Be daring, be of good courage!  This is not a command from Mount Sinai, with fire, lightning, and the terrifying splendor of God’s glory.  It is an invitation. It’s like when our Lord says, “Believe the Gospel!” That means, “Receive forgiveness, life, and the glory of God as a free gift!”  It comes not out of cloud and fire, but out of the mouth of a man who appeared with no beauty or majesty that we should desire Him.  It comes from the mouth of a man like us in every way, who is facing death Himself.

Be bold!  I have conquered the world.

 

Jesus is not a sergeant in a trench, stoking his soldiers’ sense of courage and honor to motivate them to go over the top and charge into gunfire against the enemy.  The boldness Jesus is talking about comes from Him. I have conquered the world.  He is victorious. We have been singing about Jesus the conqueror all through Easter.  This is the feast of victory for our God, Alleluia!  Alleluia!  Blessing, honor, glory, and might be to God and the Lamb forever, Amen; for the Lamb who was slain has begun His reign. We sing as people whose war is already won. We sit down and feast at the victory banquet. We praise the conqueror, Jesus our Lord.

Jesus has conquered the devil, trampling him underfoot.  He cannot accuse Christians before God.  We were already condemned for our sins when Jesus was handed over by Pontius Pilate.  We died for our sins when Jesus was crucified, when we were buried with Him through Baptism into death.  And God the Father raised us, gave us new lives, made us new creatures when Jesus rose from the dead.  Our new life as sons of God, no longer slaves of the evil one, is by faith in Jesus, our righteousness and justification.

When Jesus conquered Satan, He also conquered sin.  It is now forgiven and blotted out, not through our repenting and being sorry and trying to do better, but through Jesus’ death and resurrection.

And, as He says here, I have conquered the world. The world gives tribulation to Jesus first, then to all who belong to Jesus. Tribulation means to be threatened with death. Open persecution for Christians is part of this, but also the world’s mockery, refusal to hear, its despising of Jesus and scorn of His people.  All these things threaten the existence of Jesus’ community of holy believers, His Church, as well as the existence of congregations like ours.  The Church has always been threatened with death in one way or another.  It has never been clear to human eyes how Jesus’ true Church, that believes His Word and is faithful to it, could continue to survive on the earth.

But Jesus tells us how the Church survives, and how Christians will be bold and daring when their existence seems uncertain, even impossible.  Our security, our existence is assured not by working hard, and not by visible signs that we are secure. The life of Christ’s Church is sure because Jesus has defeated the world.

He made a mockery of the world’s threats, showed them to be hollow. When Jesus proclaimed the Word of God in purity, He was opposed by all the powerful people in His society. Also most of the masses of people didn’t hear what He was saying; they came for His miracles but didn’t believe or listen to His teaching.  If Jesus had wanted to be a success in a worldly way, He needed to change His message to something that didn’t threaten the world.  But He didn’t. He preached God’s Word even though few listened and though He was threatened with suffering and death.

The world followed through on its threats, and Jesus was crucified and buried.

And then He rose in victory.  The world did its worst to Him; it killed Him. And this only resulted in the world’s defeat.  Because now His disciples went forth and preached His resurrection.  Instead of destroying Jesus’ kingdom, tribulation only laid its foundation and caused it to spread.

Be bold, St. Peter.  Be daring, St. Peter!  Do not be afraid.  Be of good courage.  You have not and will not overcome the world by hard work, industry, virtuous living, though these things are good and necessary.  Extraordinarily talented leaders and preachers are gifts of God, but they do not and cannot overcome the world. Churches that the world marvels at because they are full, beautiful, and successful according to your eyes are sometimes that way by my blessing, says the Lord.  But they have not overcome this world. Should you be confident and bold when you have these things, and terrified, anxious, and despondent when you don’t?

Be bold and daring, says He who sits at the right hand of God.  I have conquered the world, and You have Me.

From this boldness and daring which comes from faith in Jesus’ victory come two things.

The first is prayer.  It takes boldness to dare to come and speak with God with confidence that He will hear You and grant Your prayer.  People think prayer is easy until the reality of their sin dawns upon them. Then they are full of doubt about whether God listens to them; they are doubtful about whether they should even come into His presence, how they can even dare to take Jesus’ name on their lips.

This is why Jesus said to the 12: Until now you have asked nothing in My name.  (John 16:24)  The disciples were timid in approaching God.  Who are we, that God should listen to us?  Indeed, we are nothing.  In ourselves, we are right to suspect that God will not listen to us.

But we are not in ourselves.  We come to God in the authority of Jesus His Son who came for us and gave us His Name and standing before the Father.

When our Lord says, “Be bold!” He is saying, Ask the Father in My Name.  Jesus doesn’t promise that God will give us whatever we think is good.  He promises to give us whatever we ask according to Jesus’ will for His Kingdom.  St. Peter is part of the Kingdom of Jesus Christ. It is His fortress, His outpost on this limestone cliff, overlooking an anxious, depressed city, full of people crushed by sin.  Many of them don’t even know what is crushing them.  They don’t know what sin is, much less who saves from it.

Kings and generals have in front of them the map of the whole campaign.  Soldiers on the front lines don’t.  Whether the Lord wills for St. Peter to be here till He comes, whether He wills, at some point in the future, to send His soldiers here elsewhere, we do not know.

But let us be bold and daring, confident that the King is victorious and will lead us in victory.  Trusting in Him, let us go to Him for the spiritual armor and provisions we need to carry out His purpose for us here and now with good courage and high morale.  Let us fight!  Let us dare to be courageous in this fight, to stand for the truth, to hold to His Word, to sacrifice and risk that His name may be glorified!  But let us do so under His authority, and call on Him to give us what we need to carry out His plan, not our own plans.

Second, the boldness that comes from Jesus’  victory works in Christians something that the world doesn’t understand.  In addition to confidence that God hears us, that we are saved and forgiven–something the world regards as uncertain–faith in Jesus’ victory over the world produces joy in the midst of tribulations, in the midst of the threat of death.

That is something incomprehensible to the world, and even to us in our weakness, much of the time.

But consider.  Jesus says, In this world you have tribulation. Tribulation, the threat of death for the Church, will never go away as long as we are Christians and are in this world.  Jesus had great tribulation; so did His apostles.  Martin Luther had it 500 years ago.  Faithful Christians at St. Peter experience it.  Various people have told me the same story at different times: It seems like God just sends me one thing after another.  I can’t understand it.

We shouldn’t look at this as though something strange were happening to us, as St. Peter says in chapter 4 of his first epistle. Instead, he says, Rejoice insofar as you share Christ’s sufferings, that you may also rejoice and be glad when His glory is revealed (1 Pet. 4:12-13). Jesus says that it will be this way in the world.  When it happens, it is a mark that we belong to Jesus and will share His glory.

The president of our congregation, Mark Kroll, wrote a history of St. Peter at the 150th anniversary of the Church.  If you don’t have a copy, you should get one and read it.  It isn’t long, and it is encouraging to read, because we see that we are not unique in our tribulations; yet God managed to keep St. Peter through them in the past.  That is the benefit also of learning about the history of the Reformation.  All throughout the history of the church, people wondered how it would survive, it had so many troubles; yet the Lord’s mercy upheld her.

The history relates that a few years after St. Peter started, there was a pastor who came, after which great divisions erupted in the congregation.  He was accused of  “not fostering peace in the congregation, and not supporting the use of the German language in the school.” The second doesn’t seem like a very godly thing to have conflict about in the church. Yet the division was so bad that, a story says, one member got in the habit of carrying a pistol to church meetings.

That’s pretty bad.  We have experienced our share of conflict and division in the decade I’ve been here.  Even though no one has come to church armed–that I know of– it’s still a sad and sinful thing when the church is full of unforgiveness and division.

Eventually the pastor left with about half of the congregation.  It’s hard to see how you could look at this with anything other than mourning and near despair.

I am sure that people thought or said things like this: “How can God be in this place when there is so much sin and evil?  We have been judged for our sins.  We are defeated.”

Yet, something amazing happened.  The congregation, which had not really been Lutheran at that point–though it had that name on the door–called a pastor from Concordia Seminary in St. Louis.  This pastor taught the congregation patiently, and in a few years St. Peter was a different church.  It adopted the Unaltered Augsburg Confession as its confession of faith, the first statement of faith of the Lutheran Reformation, in 1530. A few years later it embraced the entire Book of Concord, the book that contains all of the Lutheran statements of faith.  As a result it joined the young synod that we now know as the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod.

How different things would have been had this not happened!  If St. Peter had not gone this way, if the tribulation of conflict had not come to her in her formative years, if she still existed today she would have almost certainly been a member congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the largest Lutheran denomination in this country.  That would have meant that St. Peter would be part of a church that does not confess the Bible as the verbally inspired, inerrant Word of God.  It would be part of a denomination that has embraced same-sex marriage and other revisions of God’s commandments.  It would be served by pastors who may or may not acknowledge the Bible as God’s Word in every part. And as a result, the truth taught only in the Bible, and nowhere else–that we are by nature sinful and unclean and are saved from hell only through faith in Jesus, without our works–that would not be clearly proclaimed.

Be of good courage!  Be bold!  By faith in Jesus, who died and rose again, overcoming the world, we come to have joy in this tribulation that is always with us in the Church.  We have joy because tribulation can’t destroy us; it can’t even harm us.  Our conqueror always turns it to our blessing, as He did in such a magnificent way at the very beginning of our congregation. Our defeats become victories–for Jesus and for us.  Even our worst falls into sin are turned to blessing and victory by our Lord–as He did long ago with the fall of the apostle whose name our congregation bears.

Be bold and daring, St. Peter.  Your Lord has not left you.  He has conquered the world, and in Him, so have you.

Amen.

Alleluia!  Christ is risen!

Soli Deo Gloria

Asking God the Father. Rogate, Easter 6, 2016

Cima_da_Conegliano,_God_the_FatherRogate—The Sixth Sunday of Easter

St. Peter Lutheran Church

St. John 16:23-30

May 1, 2016

“Asking God the Father”

Iesu Iuva

 

Alleluia! Christ is Risen!

 

It’s been a long time for most of us since we asked our fathers for anything, but not for all of us. The catechumens who are here today still have to ask their fathers and mothers for help with their homework, or to let them go over to their friends’ house, or to play video games for five more minutes instead of doing their homework.

 

What is it like to ask your father for something? It depends on your father, doesn’t it? It also depends what you’re asking for.

 

I know with my father, who has now been gone for almost nine years, a lot depended on his mood. Since my dad didn’t talk as much as I do, I had to be able to read his mood before I could ask him for something and expect to receive it. I had to know him. And I did know him. At least I knew how to read his moods and tell whether it was a good time to ask him for something that I wanted.

 

Whatever your father was or is like, I am sure it was the same for you. Knowing your father was a big part of being able to ask him for something and getting what you asked for. You had to know when was a good time to approach him. You had to know how to speak to him. You had to know what he wanted in order to frame your request. “Dad, you know how you always tell me I need to be responsible? I really think that buying me this car will help me learn responsibility.”

 

Of course, often when we asked our fathers for things, we were tuned into the things they had said only as a means to an end. We weren’t thinking about pleasing them or honoring them when we asked for things. We were mostly thinking about getting something out of them for our own enjoyment. As I get older, I feel sorry about this. I know my dad had many failings as a man, as a father. Yet I owe my life to him. And many of the things in my character that are good I owe to him. And besides this, I know that despite his faults he loved me and wanted me to be blessed. And so, I wish that I had honored my father more, by not selfishly asking him for things that would give me temporary pleasure, but asking him for things that would have pleased him, that I knew he wanted to give me.

 

Now, as a father, I have a different perspective than I did as a child. When my son asks me for gifts, I usually want to give him what he asks for. But I don’t always. And the reason is obvious enough. I want my son to be happy now, of course. But I’m even more interested in him being happy later in life—being happy because he is a virtuous man, a good man, who knows how to work hard, manage his money, be a husband to his wife and a father to his children, who can be a blessing to his church and a help to his neighbors. I want him to be able to use the gifts God has given him to the best of his ability and not be held back by laziness, lack of self-control, greed or selfishness.

 

And even more than these things, I want my son to be happy for eternity. And because I want these things more than I want his short-term happiness, I frequently say “no” to what he asks me. When we’re at Wal-Mart and he asks me to buy him a toy, I say, “No, you have a thousand toys at home that you need to learn to pick up and put away first.”

 

So is it a surprise if you ask your Father in heaven for things and He says “No”?

 

If you look back at your life, you can probably remember many prayers in which you asked God for gifts you didn’t deserve and He said “Yes.”

 

At the same time, I know many Christians have asked God for things that seemed like they should be the Father’s will, and He said “No.” Or He said, “Not yet,” and that not yet stretched on for years and years.

 

And so when we hear Jesus say today, “Amen, Amen, I say to you, whatever you ask the Father in my Name, He will give to you,” those of us who have struggled in prayer for years may find ourselves feeling depressed at this amazing promise. Or doubtful, or cynical, or perhaps, in spite of ourselves, a little angry. If only being a Christian was as glorious and joyful as Jesus seems to describe it here.

 

It’s interesting that Jesus describes praying to God the Father in a similar way to the experience I had with my dad. He says asking God the Father for gifts depends on two things—one is being loved by the Father, the other is knowing the Father. Through faith in Jesus we receive the Father’s love: I do not say that I will ask the Father for you, because the Father Himself loves you, because you have loved Me and have believed that I came from God. (John 16:26-27) But also through Jesus we receive the knowledge of who the Father is, what He is like, what He desires. Jesus doesn’t promise His disciples will receive everything they ask the Father, but whatever you ask the Father in My Name, He will give to you. (John 16:23) “In Jesus’ Name” means we ask God the Father in the authority of Jesus, believing that God the Father receives us as His children because of Jesus. It also means that we ask what Jesus authorizes us to ask. We can ask the Father for anything, as long as we say, “Your will, not mine, be done.” But only when we ask for the things that Jesus has promised and taught us to pray for can we be certain that the Father will give them.

 

Now if we think back on many of the prayers we have prayed in our life, maybe even most, maybe even all, we will probably discover that most of what we asked the Father in heaven has been like what we asked for from our fathers and mothers on earth. We usually asked our earthly parents for things that would please us. We didn’t think, “My father and mother have been given to me by God to raise me, and He commands me to honor them; they gave me life, so I should honor them.” When we asked them for things we often thought only about what would please us in the short-term, not about what would honor and please them.

 

In the same way, even when we have prayed to the Father for godly things, often our hearts have been set on ourselves. We may have prayed for our family members, but our hearts were on ourselves instead of on what would glorify God and what would be the highest good for our family members. We were trying to escape pain and to have an easy (or easier) life.

 

But even more often we haven’t prayed. And the reason was we didn’t know or believe in the Father that Jesus reveals to us very firmly. We didn’t rightly appreciate His great power and wisdom. Even more, we doubted Jesus’ word that the Father loves us and wants to give us everything that is His. We didn’t know the greatness of God’s love for us, the love that surpasses knowledge that Paul describes in Ephesians chapter 3.

 

Christians don’t have a monopoly on the act of praying. When Jesus taught His disciples to pray, it wasn’t something totally new. The Jews prayed a lot. They had a custom of praying every morning and every evening, to go along with the morning and evening sacrifices at the temple.

 

And today lots of people believe in a God, even though it isn’t the God of the Bible. They think of Him as being a Father, and they pray to Him.

 

But Jesus gives a privilege and promise about prayer to those who believe in Him that those who don’t believe in Him don’t have. His promise is that those who believe in Him have God as their Father just as truly as He has God as His Father. The unbelieving world doesn’t have this relationship to God. God is the Father of all people, because He created us all. But those who don’t believe in Jesus don’t have the privileges of being children who are fathered by God and live in His house. They don’t live in God’s house, which means of course that they don’t have to live by the rules of His house. But it also means they don’t have the benefits of dwelling in the house of the Lord.

 

As God’s children through faith in Christ, God the Father has an open heart toward us, like a loving father has toward his children, except that God’s heart is full of perfect love, where a human father’s is imperfect. Because of this love, we can make requests of God the Father and expect to be heard.

 

But also through Jesus we know God the Father. No one can see God. But in Jesus we have the exact reflection of who God the Father is. Whoever has seen Me has seen the Father, Jesus tells Philip in John 14.

 

As we grow to know Jesus by hearing and reading His Word, receiving His absolution and His Supper, we grow to know the Father. We learn to know His grace—that He doesn’t deal with us as our sins deserve, but blesses and honors us as though we had never sinned. We learn to know His mercy and kindness, His gentleness toward sinners—even when our lives are hard and from a human perspective it appears as if He is dealing harshly with us. We learn to know His power to save, deliver, and defend us, which knows no limits. We learn all these things especially from Jesus’ death and resurrection. There we see God deal once and for all with our sins. All of them, including the selfishness that has motivated us to try to use God for our own ends instead of seeking Him for His own sake, He laid on Jesus. All of them He judged and punished on the cross. And all of them He showed to be removed, taken away forever when Jesus rose from the dead. And because we don’t believe this, or doubt it, He continually proclaims it to us as we come to church week in and week out, burdened by our failures, our unbelief, our feelings of alienation from God. He continues to proclaim Jesus’ resurrection from the dead, His testimony that our sins have been erased from His sight.

 

Because this is true, Jesus tells the disciples, including us, “In that day you will not ask me for anything. Amen, Amen, I say to you, whatever you ask the Father in My name, He will give it to you. Until now you have asked nothing in my name. Ask, and you will receive, that your joy may be full.” (John 16:23-24)

 

When Jesus rises from the dead, we are also alive from the dead. We are dead to sin and alive to God the Father. We are no longer God’s enemies in Adam, but new creatures who live to God in Christ. So when we speak to the Father, we come before Him as little Christs.

 

Just as Jesus received everything He asked from the Father, so will we.

 

That means that when we pray for the things Jesus promised us and taught us to pray for, we can be certain that we “will receive” those things. When we ask for God’s Word to be taught purely to us, that He will give us the Holy Spirit to believe that Word, be saved by it, and live a holy life, we will surely receive it. When we ask that God preserve us in that word and faith until we die, we will surely receive it. When we ask for God to give us daily bread—what we need to support this life—He will not fail us. Nor will He deny us forgiveness of our sins when we ask for it, nor support and deliverance from the devil’s temptations, and finally be to be brought out of this world of sorrow safely into the eternal joy of everlasting life.

 

We don’t pray those things and hope God will give them to us. That’s the way those who don’t know Jesus and His Father pray. Such prayers are not heard.

 

Instead we pray to the Father with certainty, not only that He hears us, but that He will give us whatever we ask, as though we were His Son.

 

Alleluia! Christ is risen!

 

Soli Deo Gloria

The Sign of the Crucified Son. Rogate 2014/ 157th Anniversary of the Congregation.

brazen-serpent-julius-schnorr-von-carolsfeld-1851-60Rogate/ 157th Anniversary of the Congregation

St. Peter Lutheran Church, Joliet, Illinois

Numbers 21:4-9

May 25, 2014

“The Sign of the Crucified Son”

 

Iesu Iuva!

 

People commonly believe

That God chooses good people to be His people.

 

No!

 

God chooses people while they are still objects of His wrath.

 

He saves people whom He has just struck down in His wrath.

 

He chooses people who are on death’s door because of their sins.

 

When we have been struck by His wrath and are dying,

                He lifts up before us

                                The sign of His crucified Son.

 

This sign means that all His wrath is taken away from us.

 

We can see this fact in the Old Testament reading this morning.

 

The story from the Old Testament is not just the story of the rebellious Israelites.  It’s our story too.

 

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This is the story of the Israelites: They’re angry with God.

 

They’re so angry with Him they reject Him.  They cast Him away.

 

They’re angry with Him because they don’t believe His promises.  They’re angry because God isn’t giving them what they expect from a god—wealth, prestige, power.

 

“The Lord and Moses brought us out here to kill us,” they say.  “Look, there’s no food and no water, and we’re sick of this worthless bread.”

 

“We hate you, God,” they’re saying.  “You never loved us.  You were always waiting to destroy us.”

 

So God struck them in His wrath.  He sent fiery serpents into their midst, who bit them, and many died.

 

You ask, How is this our story?

 

Read more…

Rogate Sunday (Easter 6)–Prayer (Gebets-Schatz)

man-praying-1883_jpg!BlogRogate–The Sixth Sunday of Easter

Numbers 21:4-9 or Lamentations 3:22-33

1 Timothy 2:1-6 or James 1:22-27

St. John 16:23-30

Prayer on the Sunday of Rogate

O Lord God, heavenly Father!  Through Your Son You have promised us that You would give us whatever we ask in Your Name.  We beseech You: keep us steadfast in Your Word.  Grant us Your Holy Spirit, Who rules and leads us according to Your will.  Protect us from the devil’s kingdom, from false doctrine and false worship; protect us also against all misfortune in body and life.  Give us Your blessing and peace, that we may experience Your gracious assistance in everything, and praise and glorify You as our gracious Father here in time and there in eternity, through Christ our Lord.  Amen.  Johannes Eichorn, 1511-1564

In that day you will ask in My Name.

It is impossible to mention in the intercessions of corporate worship all the persons who are committed to our care, or at any rate to do so in the way that is required of us.  Every Christian has his own circle who have requested him to make intercession for them or for whom he knows he has been called upon especially to pray.  These will be, first of all, those with whom he must live day by day.

This brings us to a point at which we hear the pulsing heart of all Christian life in unison.  A Christian fellowship lives and exists by the intercession of its members for one another, or it collapses.  I can no longer condemn or hate a brother for whom I pray, no matter how much trouble he causes me.  His face, that hitherto may have been strange and intolerable to me, is transformed in intercession into the countenance of a brother for whom Christ died, the face of a forgiven sinner.  This is a happy discovery for the Christian who begins to pray for others.  There is no dislike, no personal tension, no estrangement that cannot be overcome by intercession as far as our side of it is concerned.  Intercessory prayer is the purifying bath into which the individual and the fellowship must enter every day.  The struggle we undergo with our brother in intercession may be a hard one, but that struggle has the promise that it will gain its goal.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Life Together (Harper San Francisco, 1954) p. 85-86.

 

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